Homes & Design Photo Credit:

Flooring—Art Underfoot

Look down: innovation and creativity have gone horizontal. Take it to the floor, from rather glam graffiti and beastly (in name only) beauty to concrete chic and hardwood that quite literally clears the air.

Fresh Breath

This hardwood flooring is like having living trees in your home—three, in fact. As the world’s first smart hardwood floor, Pure Genius from Lauzon (from $6.83 per squa re foot) is like a giant filter that breaks down toxins to purify indoor air. lauzonflooring.com


cool canvas

Cool Canvas

B.C. artist Zoë Luyendijk uses ancient rug-making techniques to create contemporary, West Coast-inspired designs. Her new Line and Spot collection features the Beast Orange (price on request), an abstract-art piece for the floor that looks as scintillating as it sounds. colin-campbell.ca


fly carpet

Fly Carpet

Another canvas-like rug that evokes street style, the Metro Lexington ($10,400) has the edgy look of fly­post artwork at a Manhattan subway station. Yet it’s anything but gritty in plush hand-knotted Himalayan wool and Chinese silk. 2ndcenturyrug.ca


© Colin Gillen/framelight.ie

 

Statement Maker

With a name that plays on the celebrated British street artist Banksy, the Banksy (nudge, nudge) range of graffiti-art- inspired porcelain tiles from Peronda brings some serious attitude underfoot ($16 per square foot). peronda.com


 

concrete chic

Concrete Chic

Get the artsy loft look with porcelain tile that looks just like industrial concrete with Apavisa’sRegeneration series (from $12 per square foot). It’s a warehouse aesthetic reimagined for contemporary living spaces. apavisa.com


 

Gonzo Style

No need to be delicate or balanced—the latest flooring trends demand a bold approach. Here’s how to express yourself on the ground.

Be Brave: Whether with graffiti or lyrical linear art, don’t be afraid to be colourful and edgy underfoot. Art works just as well on the horizontal as it does on vertical walls.

Lighten Up: Dark espresso floors have become so ubiquitous that it’s time to give a lighter stone or concrete look and natural, unstained wood tones another chance. Think grainy and raw.

Go Big: It’s all about large-format tiles. Embrace the maxi-slab over the mosaic. With minimal visual clutter you get maximum design impact.

Mono Tone. Keep it simple with one material (stone, tile, hardwood) and run with it. Vary the finish, even the slab/tile/plank size, but maintain one palette throughout a space for a cohesive—and commanding—look.

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